A prepayment penalty clause states that a penalty will be assessed if the borrower significantly pays down or pays off the mortgage, usually within the first five years of the loan. Prepayment.

The severity of prepayment penalty: Some prepayment penalties diminish in severity as the mortgage matures. You could, for example, be penalized 5 percent on any funds prepaid within one year of loan origination, 4 percent in the second year, 3 percent for the third year, and so on.

The best way to avoid prepayment fees, of course, is to choose a personal loan or mortgage without prepayment penalties. If you’re stuck with a prepayment penalty on your loan, however, all is not lost. There are ways to avoid paying loan prepayment penalties. Here’s what you need to know in order to avoid prepayment penalty fees.

What is a loan prepayment penalty? The concept may sound strange to anyone who’s struggling to get out of debt.Simply put, a prepayment penalty is a fee that must be paid if you pay off a loan before the loan’s term.That’s right, as unbelievable as it sounds, you can be punished for paying off a loan sooner rather than later.

You may come across prepayment penalties in a number of different types of loans. Mortgages. If you do see a prepayment penalty, it’s most likely on a mortgage loan. While it has become less common since the 2008 housing crisis, some mortgage loans still come with these fees, which can add up to thousands of dollars.

Save Money on Your Mortgage by Prepaying Determine your prepayment penalty type. For mortgage loans, there are two major types of prepayment penalties that charge the penalty under different circumstances. A "hard" prepayment penalty charges a penalty if the borrower refinances or sells their house. A "soft" penalty, on the other hand, only charges the penalty if the borrower refinances.

Alimony Mortgage Qualification Debt-to-Income (DTI) is a lending term which describes a person’s monthly debt load as compared to their monthly gross income. Mortgage lenders use Debt-to-Income to determine whether a mortgage.

For a mortgage loan of $200,000, the prepayment penalty could range from $4,000 to $8,000. These penalties kick in not only if you pay down your mortgage loan in a short period of time, but also if you refinance an existing mortgage loan that has a prepayment penalty.

Piggy Back Loan Piggyback loan example. Two sisters, Ruth and Sharon, purchase a condominium located out of town. Because of its great location, units are expensive and they don’t have the $26,000 deposit.

Similar to mortgage loans it isn’t guaranteed that these loans have a prepayment penalty, but if so, it should be in the contract. Be sure to contact your lender or institution that services the loan to find out if there are any prepayment penalties before paying extra towards your debt.